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The 1830 Greek Revival Fontaine House

May 18, 2018
Greek Revival ionic columns on the facade of the Fontaine House.

Photo: Library of Congress

Fan light above entrance to the Greek Revival Fontaine House.

Photo: Library of Congress

Grand staircase and foyer inside the Greek Revival Fontaine House.

Photo: Library of Congress

Greek Revival door case inside the Fontaine House.

Photo: Library of Congress

Marble fireplace mantle inside the Greek Revival Fontaine House.

Photo: Library of Congress

Pocket Doors inside the parlor of the Greek Revival Fontaine House.

Photo: Library of Congress

A view of the front facade of the historic Greek Revival Fontaine House.

Photo: Library of Congress

 

In a world without railroads, navigable waterways were dominated transportation. In northwestern Georgia, the Chattahoochee River was one of the prime highways for merchants to transport their wares to markets abroad. In 1828 the Georgia legislature established Columbus at the first navigable point of the Chattahoochee River with a mind to maximize their ability to distribute area produce. It’s first mayor, John Fontaine, had already established profitable business in the vicinity.  In 1830, he decided to build a home that reflected his success. In 1830 the Greek Revival style was all the rage. It reflected the aspirations of the young democracy toward the Greek ideal. Six mighty columns graced the facade whilst inside a sweeping stair & numerous tasteful appointments greeted visitors.

 

John Fontaine’s descendants occupied for several decades until the area became too industrialized to be fashionable. The Elks then took residence and remained in the Fontaine House until the middle of the twentieth century. Sadly, a parking lot now occupies the site of this remarkable home.

 

Best bits? That fireplace! Also, all those wonderful rosettes!

 

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